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WPF C# Tutorial – Create Parallax Scrolling Endless Runner Game in Visual Studio

Main Window Function

This is the default function that’s added to the code when a new project is create. This function runs before any other because it has that intializeComponent() function to run which will load up the necessary components to add all of the design view items to the screen. We can add our own instructions to this function too. The main window function C# code is shown below.

Under the initializeComponent(); line we start adding our own instructions.

myCanvas.Focus(); this line telling this app that we want to mainly focus on the myCanvas element from the XAML code. Since we have the key down and up events linked to this element, we need it to be in focus for those to register.

gameTimer.Tick += gameEngine; this line is linking the gameEngine event we created earlier to the game timer. So each time it ticks it will trigger this gameEngine event.

gameTimer.Interval = TimeSpan.FromLilliseconds(20); this line is stating how often we want the timer to tick, in this case we want the timer to tick every 20 milliseconds. To create seamless animation and smooth movement we need to have the timer ticking faster so it looks like one continuously motion in the game. You can also set the timer interval to seconds but the animation will be really slow and it won’t feel right for this type of game.

backgroundSprite.ImageSource = new BitmapImage(new Uri(“pack://application:,,,/images/background.gif”)); this line of code is loading the background GIF file we imported earlier and loading it inside of the background sprite image brush we made earlier in the code. Inside the image brush class there is a image source function that takes in location of a BITMAP or a image file. Once it linked it will then save that file in the RAM as a texture to be used later on. In this case we are directing this image source function a new image. Inside the quotation It starts with “pack://” which means this current app package so we are looking inside this package and then going inside the application location semi colon: 3 commas,,, and then we have the images folder and finally the file name and extension.

Background.Fill = backgroundSprite and background2.Fill = backgroundSprite line is simply adding the background image we loaded earlier to both of the background rectangles on the screen.

Lastly we run the start game function by stating startGame();

Key down and Key up event

These are the two events we added earlier from the XAML code. Lets see what they do.

Key down event has a single selection inside which is a IF statement. Inside of the if statement we are checking IF (Key pressed is equals to ENTER AND game over Boolean is true) then we can run the start game function. This event will be triggered when the game is over and the player presses the enter key. While the game running pressing the enter key will not work because in this if statement both of these statement needs to be true in order for the selection to do anything.

Below is the key up event

We are programming the jump function of the player inside of the key up event because we don’t want the player to simply hold down the space bar and the player character will be jumping continuously we want them to release the key to jump and press release again to jump this way we can add restrictions to the game play.

Similar to the key down function in this key up function we have one IF statement, but inside of this if statement it takes in 3 different conditions all of those conditions must be met before any action is taken.

IF(SPACE key is pressed AND jumping is false AND player top position is greater than 260 pixels)

THEN

Set jumping to true

Force set to 15

Speed set to -12

Player sprite image brush is loading the newrunner_02.gif file inside of it so we can change the characters image when they successfully jump on the screen.

Go to page 5 for start game function source code




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